Archive for the ‘Baseball’ Category

Rain Delayed Sox Will Face Rays Again on Monday

Written by admin
Friday, 26 Jul 2013

315980433_2564451865001_redsoxwideThe final game of this week’s Red Sox and Tampa Bay Rays series was rained out yesterday giving the Sox a chance to regroup before Monday’s scheduled makeup game. Although the Sox currently lead the standings in the AL East, the Rays are only one game behind. After two losses to the Rays’ excellent pitching staff this week, the Red Sox Nation is hoping for a comeback next week. The Rays plan on pitching either Roberto Hernandez or David Price in the makeup game. Price, who recently returned from 47 days on the disability list, pitched Wednesday’s game that resulted in a 5-1 win for the Rays. If you missed last night’s game due to the rain delay, come out on Monday and stay in one of our Brookline hotels for a chance to see the Sox face the Rays for the rescheduled final game of the series.

Happy Father’s Day!

Written by admin
Sunday, 16 Jun 2013

Here at the Beacon Inn we’d like to wish all the dads out there a very happy Father’s Day! If you’re staying with us in Boston this weekend, we have a few suggestions for things to do:

Visit the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum:Just a short drive from Boston, the deCordova Sculpture Park offers a great outdoor art experience. If you’re looking to get a little fresh air and see some great modern sculpture, this is a unique museum that we highly recommend. Dads get free admission from 10am to 5pm!

Grab a Father’s Day Brunch: Zaftigs Delicatessen is one of our favorite brunch destinations in Boston for both savory and sweet options, but you can definitely expect a wait, especially for a Sunday brunch on Father’s Day. If you don’t mind standing in line for a little while, the food is well worth the wait! (We recommend the potato pancakes and the banana-stuffed French toast.) It’s a pleasant walk from either of our Beacon Street locations. If you’re looking for something a little different and don’t mind a little more of a walk, we recommend Deep Ellum for a slightly more upscale brunch (duck confit hash!) or the Allston Diner for a hipster take on Southern comfort food (chicken and waffles!), both in the neighboring community of Allston.

Take a Tour of Fenway Park: Between 11am and 2pm, stop by Fenway Park for their annual Father’s Day “Walk in the Park.” This free event gives families a close-up look at one of America’s most historic ballparks. Take a walk around the warning track, sit inside the visitor and home dugouts, and get autographs from Red Sox alumni!

Exploring Boston’s Hidden Ballparks

Written by admin
Monday, 29 Apr 2013

Now, if you’re a Red Sox fanatic—and after trucking around town to see a statue and plaque, you should be by now (see our previous post about the Huntington Avenue Grounds)—you can continue your tour of the Olde Towne Teams’ former haunts on another college campus: Boston University.

Until 1953, Boston enjoyed two baseball clubs: the National League Braves (formerly the Boston Red Stockings, the oldest continually-playing team in American sports), before the team moved to Atlanta via Milwaukee, and the American League Red Sox (formerly the Boston Americans; confused yet?)

bravesuseOn the site of what is now BU’s Nickerson playing field stood the Braves Field, a stone’s throw from Fenway. Built in 1915, it held its ground for 37 years—hosting three World Series and an All Star Game—before being demolished to make way for university dorms and Astroturf.  But it wasn’t entirely demolished, and that’s where things get interesting.

Baseball fans should see what’s left of Braves Field because, well, the jewel-box-park style of concourse under the right-field pavilion’s bleachers looks just as it did back in the day (unlike Fenway’s concourse, which has been more recently updated), and because Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Leon Cadore and Braves pitcher Joe Oeschger battled it out for a pair of complete-game performances… that lasted for a still-record 26 innings! In other words: you’re in the presence of past greatness.

Everyone else—looking at you, moms and dads taking your kids on college visits—should see it because you’re going to want to tell your friends that you saw something other than the back of a student tour guide’s head. Regular tourists and rabid baseball fans alike, take note; for a quintessentially Boston experience, the Beacon Inn can help.

Visit Boston’s Historic Ballparks

Written by staff
Friday, 12 Apr 2013

On rare occasion, The Beacon Inn bed and breakfast hosts the most American type of guest: those road-tripping across country to visit every National and American league baseball park. In that spirit—and the spirit of this, the first month of the baseball season—we’re duty-bound to remind our other, more relaxed guests that Fenway Park is open for business. You are welcome to worship there during your stay, and we have it on good information that Boston’s holy leaders give dispensation for mistaking this green jewel for a Temple.

Yawkey Way, the street on which Fenway is parked, is tree-lined and especially pretty at sunset, on game day, when it’s closed to automotive traffic and opens up to allow fans to stroll among souvenir hawkers, baseball cap vendors, and street food purveyors. If marinating in the history of the area brings about a Red Sox conversion experience to a stark-raving Sox fan, the baseball-deranged staff at the front desk can help!

The bed and breakfast staff can recommend a number of other Boston baseball sites that recall the sport’s early glory days. Head over to Huntington Avenue, home of Northeastern’s campus, to see the site of the Huntington Avenue American Base Ball Grounds.

WorldSeries1903-640While the site itself is unimpressive today (it’s Northeastern’s indoor athletic arena), there is a plaque and statue on an adjacent street named World Series Way. Both the plaque and statue were erected in 1993, the former to memorialize the park’s hosting the first World Series in 1903 and the latter to commemorate Cy Young pitching the first perfect game of the modern era one year later in 1904.

That should be plenty of baseball touring for one afternoon, and imagining Cy Young pitching a no-hitter will work up an appetite. If that’s the case, Chicken Lou’s is a short walk from World Series Way, and despite it’s small size (it’s a 10’ by 20’ shack), it serves up delicious sandwiches with names like the Cholesterol (bacon, egg & cheese), TKO (chicken, swiss, bacon & honey mustard), and Naughty Nuggets (fried chicken nuggets). Just like The Babe used to eat.